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Magic messages

Writing helps keep kids entertained, while they’re finding out about themselves and the world around them. Here are some activities you can do together which will help your child write, and enjoy themselves at the same time.

Thank you

When your child receives a gift or a treat, you could encourage them to send a 'thank you' drawing. To get them started, you could talk about the person they're doing the drawing for, and what that person might like a drawing of. Do they like dogs? Is the dog a happy or a sad dog? What's the dog's name? Who is the dog’s best friend? Lots of kids love making pictures for other people - and the person who gets it will be very happy too.

Dear Tooth Fairy

If your child's tooth falls out, you could help them write a message or draw a picture for 'The Tooth Fairy', then put it under their pillow with the tooth. You could even write a message or draw a picture back to them (from 'The Tooth Fairy'). Just imagine their wee face when they find it and read it back to you.

Love from… me.

Another interesting activity for your child is to write a letter to a relative who lives far away. It needn’t be long - you could even stick to just three sentences - perhaps something like this:  'Hello Aunty Laura. How are you? I'm doing fine. I made a space ship out of milk bottles yesterday. Love from Harry.' Your child could then help you send it to the person - using social media, email or by post.

Hang on! Try my amazing Read ideas.

Don't forget about the everyday Count ideas.

Hang on! Try my amazing Read ideas.

Hey! There are loads of fun ways to Write too.

Handy tips

Making crayon rubbings of coins is a great way to help your child find out about the numbers on coins, and the different sizes of each coin.

Try taking it in turns to say alternate numbers to 30, while rolling or throwing a ball back and forth. Then, if you’re up for a challenge, try it backwards and in 2s. Start at different numbers, or if you don’t have a ball handy pat your tummy or clap your hands while you count.

Next time you’re in a shop, get your child to look for prices and check how much different things cost. You could turn it into a bit of a treasure hunt, and look for items that cost more than and less than £1. Or look for any item that costs £2 exactly. If something is on offer – 2 for £1, say – you could help your child work out what each individual item costs.